PROGRAM STATEMENT

Hucklebug Preschool Inc. idealizes Ontario’s pedagogy, How Does Learning Happen. This document and others (Ontario Early Years Framework, Ontario Early Learning Framework, Think Feel Act: Lessons from Research About Young Children, Early Learning for Every Child Today) guide us in our work with children and families.

Hucklebug ‘s program statement is consistent with the Minister of Educations’ policy statement on programming and pedagogy issued under subsection 55 (3) of the OEYCC Act and we shall review the program statement at least annually for this purpose.

Hucklebug  views children as being competent, capable, curious and rich in potential.

Our program statement describes the goals that guide our programs for children and the approaches that we use to:

   ◊ promote the health, safety, nutrition and well-being of the children;

   ◊ support positive and responsive interactions among the children, parents and educators;

   ◊ encourage the children to interact and communicate in a positive way and support their ability to self-regulate;

   ◊ foster the children’s exploration, play and inquiry;

   ◊ provide child-initiated and adult-supported experiences;

   ◊ plan for and create positive learning environments and experiences in which each child’s learning and development will be supported;

   ◊ incorporate indoor and outdoor play, as well as active play, rest and quiet time, into the day, and give consideration to the individual needs of the children receiving child care;

   ◊ foster the engagement of and ongoing communication with parents about the program and their children;

   ◊ involve local community partners and enable those partners to support the children, their families and educators;

   ◊ support educators, or others who interact with the children at a child care centre in relation to continuous professional learning; and

   ◊ document and review the impact of the strategies set out above on the children and their families.

Hucklebug ensures that all new educators, students and volunteers review the program statement prior to interacting with children and at any time when the program statement is modified.

Hucklebug shall ensure that the approaches set out in its program statement are implemented in the operation of its program at each child care centre it operates and each premises where it oversees the provision of child care.

Goals of Hucklebug:

   a) To manage, support, and maintain licenced early learning and child care sites.

   b) To provide licenced child care in the County of Peterborough.

   c) To involve parents, families and educators in the activities of the children and in all aspects of the services of Hucklebug.

   d) To provide through the effort of educators, an opportunity for each child to participate in a play based program aimed at promoting developmentally appropriate social, emotional, physical, and               cognitive growth.

Our approaches:

   ◊ promote the health, safety, nutrition and well-being of the children;

1.     Following Canada’s food guide for healthy meals and snacks, the children are involved in our “family” style meals by setting, clearing dishes, sitting and having conversations around the table. Self-served snacks are offered morning and afternoon. Educators model table manners and encourage healthy choices.

2.     Indoor and outdoor play environments are safe spaces for children and educators to explore and learn together.

Policies: Child Ill Health, Health and Safety(16), Nutrition(31) and Food Handling(7) Staff Training

Documentation = Attendance chart, daily group chart, allergy/sensitivy list, indoor/outdoor safety checklist, injury report,

   ◊ support positive and responsive interactions among the children, parents and educators;

1.     Interactions between and among child/educator, child/child, child/parent, and educator/parent are valuable and build important relationships where the quality of child care is improved.

2.     Parent communication boards are located in each program for families to see what is happening. Email, telephone, text messaging are important ways parents can communicate with their child’s   program.

3.     Siblings that are registered in our programs have the opportunity to visit each other.

4.     Parents and families are invited to be involved in their children’s program by; fundraising activities, bringing items/resources from home, sharing learning opportunities,

5.     Family involvement opportunities (tea party, BBQ, party) happen two times per year, spring and late fall where parents, educators and children celebrate together.

Policies: Child Illness Policy17

Documentation: child documentation, activity documentation

   ◊ encourage the children to interact and communicate in a positive way and support their ability to self-regulate;

1.     Environments are created to be child-friendly with appropriate sized tools. We encourage children to help with many tasks, tidying, self-help, sweeping.

2.     Daily routines create a balance to our day so the children have ample time to play and learn.

3.     Communication skills for children begin early, our infants are using signs to communicate and support their language development. Educators use positive words to guide children. (“walking feet”-not “don’t run”)

4.     Educators observe children and encourage the child to use problem-solving skills. We wait and watch.

5.     Self-regulation is your child’s ability to handle stress. When each child’s physiological needs are met (rested, fed, comfortable), they are ready to practise regulation. Educators use calm breathing techniques.

Policies: Prohibitive Practises, Behavior Guidance

Documentation: program plans

   ◊ foster the children’s exploration, play and inquiry;

1.     Active and engaged exploring the world with body, mind and senses.

2.     Purposeful curious approaches to learning. The children are engaged in planning with educators.

3.     Risk-taking where appropriate is being explored and supervised in all our programs. Allowing the children some freedom within limits to explore their world.

Policies: Philosophy, Educator job descriptions

Documentation: child documentation, activity documentation

    ◊ provide child-initiated and adult-supported experiences;

1.     Programming is  based on observations of children and building on the interests of the child. Educators are playing and interacting with the children, and play can be spontaneous.

2.     Opportunites for different types of activities, active and quiet play, small groups, large group and quiet alone time. Educator guided experiences throughout a free flowing day.

3.     Projects may last days and there is space to store creations for another time.

Policies: Educator job descriptions

Documentation; program plans, observations, child/activity documentation

   ◊ plan for and create positive learning environments and experiences in which each child’s learning and development will be supported;

1.     Learning environments within classrooms change based on children’s interests.

2.     We look at the whole child to support learning. Cognitive, speech and language, physical, large and small muscle and senses.

3.     Children, families and educators are connected and all belong in our programs.

Policies: Philosophy

Documentation: program plans

   ◊ incorporate indoor and outdoor play, as well as active play, rest and quiet time, into the day, and give consideration to the individual needs of the children receiving child care;

1.     This is essential

2.     Outdoor play for two hours each day in a full day program. Often outdoor items are brought in and our indoor activities are outdoors as well.

3.     Rest time

Policies: Philosophy

Documentation: program plans

    ◊ foster the engagement of and ongoing communication with parents about the program and their children;

1.     Relationship building with families is important for the quality of child care we provide children.

2.     Connecting with educators at drop off and pick up times is a great way to communicate daily. Parent information boards, email, telephone and text messaging are tools we use.

3.     Parents and guardians are invited to participate in our programs and share their resources.

Policies: Parent handbook

Documentation: parent information boards, website, email

    ◊ involve local community partners and allow those partners to support the children, their families and educators;

1.     Children and educators explore our communities in a variety of ways, Grandfriends, walks, visits, library, guests coming to centres.

2.     We are supported by other agencies that support children and families; Five Counties Children’s Centre, PFRC, Kinark, Public Health.

3.     We often have student trainees from NDHS Co-op, Fleming and Loyalist Colleges, when students are practising their skills and learning for their future. These adults are not counted in our ratios and are not responsible for the children.

4.     Food boxes come to the centre twice monthly from YWCA, fresh affordable produce locally sourced.

Policies: Supervising Students & Volunteers, CRC+VSS, Nutrition

Documentation: family service plan, individual child plan

   ◊ support educators, or others who interact with the children at a child care centre in relation to continuous professional learning;

1. CECE, Ontario’s College for ECEs encourages educators to be continually learning. Hucklebug’s policy for staff training requires all educators to be involved in training, workshops or meetings. All staff are trained in Standard First Aid and Infant/Child CPR.

2. Peterborough City County Quality Initiative has brought “Raising the bar” on quality child care to our programs. Many opportunities for professional development and network meetings are included.

3. Parenting opportunities are offered with the partnership of PFRC’s Norwood Hub at NDHS.

Policies: Philosophy, Staff Training

Documentation: Raising the Bar

   ◊ document and review the impact of the strategies set out above on the children and their families;

1.     Photo documentation, making learning visible

2.     Observations and planning

3.     Parent survey, bi-annual

4.     Educator survey, bi-annual

5.     Annual review at staff meetings

Policies: Philosophy

Documentation: program plans